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Time, not money, hinders regular checkups for farmers

By Mayra Diaz-Ballard
One of the main topics on everyone’s minds these days is health care. Affordability, proximity and the amount of coverage play a major role in deciding what plan is right for farmers and their families. Even with insurance, many farmers don’t make regular checkups a priority.
Karen Parm, a farmer’s wife from Graves County, said, her husband, Jimmy, is paying the price for years of not seeing a dentist or doctor because “he didn’t have time.” Continue reading

Hopkinsville Milling stays true to family ties, baking products

The sun glows on the Sunflour plant, also known as Hopkinsville Milling, at the end of Fort Campbell Boulevard. In the early 1900s, the company was called Crescent Mills.

The sun glows on the Sunflour plant, also known as Hopkinsville Milling, at the end of Fort Campbell Boulevard. In the early 1900s, the company was called Crescent Mills.

By Toni W. Riley

When 5-year-old Robert Harper was paid 25 cents to organize a desk drawer at Hopkinsville Milling for his grandfather Frank A. Yost, the youngster didn’t know he was the fifth generation of the Yost family to work at “The Mill.” Now president of Hopkinsville Milling, Harper easily
recounts the history and development of the company from its beginning in 1874.
At Seventh Street and the railroad crossing, the precursor of Hopkinsville Milling was Crescent Mills, owned by F.J. Brownell and John T. Rabbeth. Brownell was the uncle of Frank K. Yost, Harper’s great-grandfather who joined the firm in 1903.
Harper remembers the evolution of Hopkinsville Milling as it followed history and the changing United States lifestyle. He explains that milling is an industry of pennies.
“Pennies have to be watched at work as well as at home,” he said. “A person can make a good living as a miller, but they won’t get rich.”

Continue reading

Todd’s tips for protecting animal health in winter

Photo by Tony Hurt

Photo by Tony Hurt

By Susan Hurt
With the mercury dropping as quickly as the Waterford Crystal Ball in Times Square, people are bundling up and staying indoors as much as possible. But some of our four-legged friends are not as fortunate and must endure months of cold, wind, ice and snow.
When it comes to protecting animal health and ensuring their productivity, it is important to know a few facts. Dr. Todd Freeman, veterinarian of Little River Veterinary Clinic, shares a few tips to help ensure our animals can bear the winter months comfortably. Continue reading

2 recipes that are sure to warm your body, fill your belly

By Diane Turner
The visions of sugar plums have danced out of sight, the turkey and ham is all gone, and picnics and barbecues are still months away. We are now left with the short days and cold nights of winter, and I’m sure that, like me, you are looking for easy recipes to fill your family’s stomachs, so you don’t have to spend time away from them in the kitchen.
Diane’s Lasagna and Crock-Pot Pork Chops are crowd favorites among my family and friends. Both recipes are inexpensive, don’t take long to prep and are sure to please the pickiest of eaters. Hopefully your families will enjoy these recipes at dinnertime. They are also great meals to take to others who may be too busy to cook while tending to the farm. Continue reading