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Hopkinsville Milling stays true to family ties, baking products

The sun glows on the Sunflour plant, also known as Hopkinsville Milling, at the end of Fort Campbell Boulevard. In the early 1900s, the company was called Crescent Mills.

The sun glows on the Sunflour plant, also known as Hopkinsville Milling, at the end of Fort Campbell Boulevard. In the early 1900s, the company was called Crescent Mills.

By Toni W. Riley

When 5-year-old Robert Harper was paid 25 cents to organize a desk drawer at Hopkinsville Milling for his grandfather Frank A. Yost, the youngster didn’t know he was the fifth generation of the Yost family to work at “The Mill.” Now president of Hopkinsville Milling, Harper easily
recounts the history and development of the company from its beginning in 1874.
At Seventh Street and the railroad crossing, the precursor of Hopkinsville Milling was Crescent Mills, owned by F.J. Brownell and John T. Rabbeth. Brownell was the uncle of Frank K. Yost, Harper’s great-grandfather who joined the firm in 1903.
Harper remembers the evolution of Hopkinsville Milling as it followed history and the changing United States lifestyle. He explains that milling is an industry of pennies.
“Pennies have to be watched at work as well as at home,” he said. “A person can make a good living as a miller, but they won’t get rich.”

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Barn-based agri-tourism business continues to grow

By Toni W. Riley

Keith and Sara Shepherd had no idea when they took over the Shepherd family farm, that someday they would have an agri-tourism business where brides and grooms would be toasted in the barn that once held prized Shorthorn cattle.

A wedding venture might not be what first comes to mind when thinking of an agri-tourism business, but Kelly Jackson, Christian County agent for horticulture who works with the Pennyrile Region Agri-tourism Committee, says agri-tourism is any activity that brings people to a farm or a farm-like setting. Continue reading